Branding Priorities

We get it: everyone is busy. We’re all wearing multiple hats and essentially pulling cross-divisional shifts to keep the marketing train rolling. The good news is that the train is rolling. Marketing has more budget, respect, and responsibilities than ever before. The bad news is that too many times the brand is getting lost and forgotten at the station. Ultimately, the long-term value of the brand will suffer. Being a good brand steward is the single most important thing marketers can do that delivers significant value. And it’s the one thing that marketers seem to barely have time for.

Ridiculous Scope

Brian Hansford at Heinz Marketing created an excellent list of responsibilities that current CMOs are too often, possibly even typically, charged with in this LinkedIn article: The Ridiculous Scope of B2B Marketing Responsibilities. He lists 29 things, readily admits that there are likely more, and he’s probably right.

And that’s just the start of the problem. While all of them might be necessary, they all shouldn’t carry equal weight or priority within the department. To compound matters, brand strategy is hard, takes time to implement and even more time to deliver results. Studies show that when humans have to make a decision on where to put their time, they predictably choose the activity that is determined to be the most urgent. Not the most valuable. Not the most important. We choose the urgent one we can get done most expediently and check off our list.

Getting on Track Means Putting the Brand Out Front

It’s understood that clearly aligning your brand purpose with your company and creating a brand strategy is hard work. It takes time—time that marketing technology was supposed to give back to marketers but doesn’t seem to have delivered in the quantity expected. Saying that marketers need to be more disciplined in their time is a cop-out. What marketers need to do is start at the beginning and keep the main thing the main thing: the brand. When evaluating new messages, think brand before execution. When looking to reach new audiences, think brand before platforms. If it doesn’t fit with the brand, it doesn’t go forward. It’s that simple. You can start by cutting one non-essential SasS (Software as a Service) or social platform from your current list. That’s how your resource expenditures will compound the value of your brand and contribute to the overall worth, not end up as a cost on the CFO’s floor.

The following was an excerpt from a post originally posted on the Wilson Advertising blog,  Brand First … Right After I Do This Other Thing. You can read it in it’s entirety there.