Activating the Biggest Advocates—Alumni

Who loves their alma mater more than the alumni? Nobody. Would the firsthand experience of graduates at various life-points after graduation be valuable to prospective students and their parents? You’d think so. Would it be valuable to enhance the volume of communications from the school? Absolutely. That’s what makes advocate marketing such an appealing idea for higher education.

Ohio University - So depart that daily thou mayest better serve they fellowmen thy country and thou God.

What is Advocate Marketing

Influitive, a software company,  defines Advocate marketing (or advocacy marketing) as a formalized system for making customers happy, and then capitalizing on that happiness to achieve your business’ goals. It’s more authentic than traditional marketing because it’s powered by real human connections.  Working together, the organizations work with willing and happy advocates to spread their message to others in the audience. The organization offers advocates assistance and multiple options and tools to reach out, then recognizes them in a variety of fun and meaningful ways. The effect is part gamification, part peer recognition, creating a sense of belonging that advocates crave.  While Influitive’s focus has been specifically on the B2B space, the opportunities and benefits of applying this idea to an alumni-base are intriguing.

Prospective Students and Families

Instead of students interacting with a faceless university, advocate marketing could put the friendly face of experience in front of their communications. Matching students with advocates with similar interests and backgrounds can help to solidify the decision for both students and parents. Being able to ask questions and get answers firsthand from those that have been in the same position would prove invaluable in the college decision process.

Alumni and Current Students

Finding new ways to be involved with their university is something many graduates and current students strive for. Rather than just financial contributions, advocate marketing enables them to share their expertise and knowledge. Being able to participate in a meaningful way to tell both their story and that of their alma mater would be win-win. Throw in recognition for the school, as well as helping to make a difference in other’s decision and it’s a can’t lose proposition.

The University

Having an engaged alumni base and a strong corp of incoming students is the foundation for any Universities success. A university advocate can greatly expand the size of the audience that the university can meaningfully communicate. More engaged alumni give more and participate more. Setting that example and communicating it to incoming students sets the precedent that they too could become part of the future success of their school.

The Personal Connections

In an era of personalized everything, advocate marketing represents opportunities for more engagement from alumni with the university and prospective students with both alumni and the university, forming bonds that will lead to increased engagement. More than a community, giving advocates the tools to build stronger bonds cements the relationships between all of the parties involved. 

How do you interact with your alma mater? Would you be interested and participate in an advocate program if it was offered?


How Social Influencers Can Reach and Draw Hidden Audiences

Influencer marketing done well can be a powerful tool, effectively scaling targeted messages to levels that could only be dreamed of decades ago. According to a study by RhythmOne, “destination and tourism brands’ earned media value is $12.50 for every $1 spent” on influencer marketing.

So how do you do it well and achieve a similar return on your investment? The key is to define success upfront, then create a strategy and plan of action.

The is excerpt taken from Wilson Advertising, Influencer Marketing for Destinations, was first published on Dec. 6, 2017. 


Can We Co-Create Change?

Improv co-create change

Yes, And … It’s Actually More Lasting That Way

Change is hard. Anyone trying to break a habit or start a new one can testify to that. But talk about organizational change and watch entire teams lock arms and block any attempts to disrupt the status quo and the resistance is compounded tenfold, even when the group recognizes and knows that they need to change. Why is that?

It could be that we aren’t in the habit of considering alternate views and perspectives in our daily life. We tend to see and favor what we know. That carries over into business and is exacerbated when you add company history, groupthink, and “the way we’ve always done it.” We rationalize that we barely have time for ourselves. We might believe that we have an open mind and say all of the right things. But when push comes to shove, “us and ours” is what really matters. We defend it. The minds and ears shut. Any semblance of agility or willingness to change is jettisoned to protect our position. That’s to everyone’s detriment.

Stopping At What We Know Leaves Us Short of a Change Solution

We stop at what we know to be true because it has worked for us in the past—why go farther? We find one way and run with it.

Creative fields, and improv specifically, know that there is always more than one solution to any problem. When other views are seen, explored, and added to the solution, the results are always more diverse and inclusive. That makes them inherently stronger as well. What’s required is a quick way to help people search for and visualize alternative solutions and viewpoints.

See Things Differently Through Improv

Improv exercises are designed and created specifically to improve team mental and decision agility, increase trust and support, and enhance open communications. That’s what makes improv theater work on stage and what makes students of the art able to apply it effectively to everyday life, and especially business. You want examples you say? Here are just two specific exercises that come to mind and relate especially well to agility and change.

  1. Take that Back. Participants improvise a scene based on a suggestion. On a specified cue, bell, clap, command, the speaker must rewind and replace their last statement with something different and continue the scene from that new point. This forces the players to stay in the moment, get out of their head, and really listen for the next set up.
  2. Emo Op. Working in pairs, participants start a normal conversation. Once underway, the facilitator will suggest different emotions such as angry, sad, irritated, exuberant. The conversations continue, but now reflecting their new emotions. This teaches how perception impacts our communication, and how to deal with change.

While these might seem like small steps that could never bring change to a large organization, that’s where you would be wrong. Small steps, repeated over and over is exactly how big changes are made. That’s what gets the ball rolling. Institutional change requires communication, collaboration, and the ability to see other possibilities. That’s precisely what improv training provides.

Why Your Brainstorm Was Mired In Fog

Brainstorm mired by fog

Brainstorming sessions sound like a great idea. People imagine that they’ll get the best minds together, everyone will throw out great ideas, magic will be created, and they’ll arrive at newest, best-est idea ever as a team.

The fact is that this is almost never what happens. Instead, there is a lot of awkward staring in a silent room. Maybe the expected person will contribute some nonstarters,  someone else will ball-hog the air in the room, and another will play defense in support of their idea. The result is more of a wet blanket of fog rather than a downpour and flood of ideas. That’s not what anyone signed up for. And it’s not productive.

Improv Fuels Better Brainstorming Output

The principles of improv are ideal for brainstorming because they enable creation in the moment to further the ideas presented.  What many people fail to realize is that while the improv they’ve seen on stage might be created in the moment, there is a structure and principles that guide the creation. And practice. Lots of practice. Because the artists embrace the principles, they can run with it and make it look easy. Here are four thoughts from improv to be aware of before your next brainstorming session. They create a foundation for inclusion, awareness, and moving creative ideas forward.

This is our idea – Realize from the beginning that this is going to be our project, not your project. It’s “we,” not “I.” There’s a saying at the Second City, “bring a brick, not a cathedral.” That encourages participants that they need to bring an idea or thought, not a fully formed production. Allow space for the group to add their expertise and perspective to reach the best final product, or they’ll stop contributing.

Let go of the wheel – If you try to steer this thing you’ll wreck it. Improv and brainstorming sessions should have a natural flow. It will and should bump up against the edges of what’s acceptable and realistic. If it doesn’t, you and the team aren’t there yet. Trying to wrestle control will keep you from pushing ideas to where true inspiration and insight flourish. That’s not to say they can’t benefit from guidance, but trust the process. Give this horse his head to run.

Make it a safe place – Some of the ideas and paths are going to fail, but everyone has to overcome any fear associated with that fear.  You need the off-base crazy ideas as well—they just might be the catalyst that takes the idea a leap further and sets it apart. And they need to be presented and heard without judgment. Starting with the mindset, “what if this was a good idea—where would it go next?” and Yes, And-ing what comes next allows the team to explore it together without judgment.

Set the stage for success – Not considering the group dynamics and structure is one of the biggest barriers to success. No professional troop would throw a newbie onto the stage of the main act cold. It’s the same with your business team. When you’re teaching new skills, you break the process into smaller and manageable steps. For brainstorming that might require time in smaller groups and attention to the balance and make-up of the groups. Pushing associates out of their comfort zone is is key to getting the best ideas, but push too hard too soon and they’ll shut down and not contribute.

Improv A Better Brainstorm

The result of an improv-based brainstorm is that more people are included, invested in the project, and contributing. Employers get the full benefit of the creative minds they hired. Associates get to do what they enjoy most. And the number and quality of ideas will surpass by many factors of those created in meetings stuck in a brain fog without improv.

Inclusion and Improv—Where the Top and Bottom Meet

improv improves inclusion

Inclusion-ing the Best Ideas from Anywhere

“The best ideas can come from anywhere.” Everyone has heard that phrase, and most agree with it, at least publicly. But before a great idea can be acted upon, it needs to be presented. Then it needs to be heard.

Unfortunately, those two ideas—risk-free sharing and active listening—often don’t co-exist in a corporate hierarchal structure. Many don’t share their ideas because it’s not their place and fear that they won’t be accepted. Some at the top aren’t willing to listen, believing that leading is dictating what must be done. The most innovative and agile business environments are inclusive and have steered clear of this trap. But if you don’t have that culture now, how do you get there?

Improv Necessitates Inclusion

The basic tenet of improv, “Yes, And,” requires inclusion and that the participants work together. Instead of saying “no,” which effectively crushes the direction, they “Yes, And” what their partners give them. The result is that ideas continue to build and are explored deeper. Here are some ways that improv can teach any organization to become more inclusive.

Participate Positively – Your partners are counting on you to “Yes, And” (never “no” or “yes, but). You have to say or do something, anything, or else it’s over prematurely. And nobody wants it to be over prematurely.

Listen Actively – Building from the previous, you have to actively listen to what’s being laid before you in order to build the scene. If you are listening to respond and formulating something clever, you’ll miss key points. How smart is that?

Direct Collaboratively – Studies show that the best performing groups don’t have defined leaders. Because the lead in improv continuously jumps from person to person organically, anyone forcing themselves as a “leader” will block the flow. Grabbing the spotlight doesn’t work here, sharing does.

Act Empathetically – While improv encourages spontaneous interaction, becoming aware of how your actions impact those around you is critical. The goal is always to make it work. What you give is important. How you react and reach out help others when they need it, even more so.

Receive Graciously – What your partner presents you is known as a “gift” in improv. It’s what enables you to contribute to the scene. Like all gifts, we hope we get a really great one,  but that’s not always the case. Regardless, make the most of it. That’s how you’ll set up your partners for future success.

Fail Collectively – Sometimes it just doesn’t work. Things go off the rails and crash. It happens, but it’s a good thing—and in improv, no one person’s fault. Used iteratively, groups can start where the previous idea came unglued, repair it, and move forward, together.

The New Smarter Ensemble

“None of us is as smart as all of us.” That truism has been born out time and again, from the collective intelligence of crowds to sports where collective-minded ensembles defeat individually-minded teams with superstars. Recognizing these facts and applying the improve principles above can enable any organization to have more engaged associates and increase innovation.